Tuesday, December 12, 2006

Let's Exclude Dick

Vice President Dick Cheney, left, and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, second from left, along with National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley, second from right, and White House Chief of Staff Josh Bolten, right, take part in a meeting between President Bush and the Vice President of Iraq Tariq al-Hashemi, not shown, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Tuesday,Dec. 12, 2006. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
Is he really wearing a lemon shirt with a lime tie? I'm thinking it's the lighting, but just in case: Dick, that citrussy look may work for Ursula Plassnik, but not for you. Never for you.

5 comments:

pissed off patricia said...

Dick is still pouting because his bestest buddy Rumsfeld is gone. Look at him. He looks so sad. I bet a good hunting trip would take that frown and turn it upside down. Nothing like shooting lawyers to make an old man smile.

Matty Boy said...

I rule the world with an iron fist, but the cool kids still won't talk to me. Oh, cruel fate!

guru-On-A-Soap-Box said...

Oh Princess, you are so right---Dick looks tart....

Jess Wundrun said...

He was kicked out of the circle for halitosis. Now you know why he doesn't open his mouth when he talks. Rumor has it he can't go on Larry King Live because the union of Dick n' Larry's bad breath would create a weapon of mass destruction that would wipe out all those little lights on the big world map fr'ever n'ever.

samael7 said...

Actually, they're all playing the Secret Rule game, a fun way to pass the time during these depressing Iraq meetings.

The game works like this: one person starts a rule -- any kind, speech, posture, whatever -- and others have to guess what it is by clues from the original Rulemaker and by observing the people who've caught on. You can't come out and say the rule, but you can get non-verbal feedback, if you know what to look for and what to ask.

Can you guess the rule here?

Hint: Bolten hasn't gotten it yet.

SuperSparkle Hint: It's a good metaphor for our actual foreign policy.